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Nelsdou

Choate stocks

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I like using the 98 action in a Choate stock, but I'm not fond of the way the front lug on the receiver rests in the stock. The bottom (horizontal) surface of the lug sits above the stock screw hole so the front action screw spans across the gap within the stock into the bottom of the lug. I've glued in shims on each side of the front action screw so the bottom lug has good contact vertically down to the step inside the stock. I'm thinking a better way would be to tear out the shims and machine a bushing for the front action screw to do the same thing and glass in that space and perhaps enough to bed the front of the receiver.

 

Have any of you Choate owners done anything like this? Will glass bedding products stick the Choate material?

 

Nels

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One other thought on synthetic stocks:

 

Before you bed them, put it in the bathtub and scrub it with some hot water and soap to remove any release compound that may be left on it from the factory. Often times, injection molded plastics have to have some type of oil prevent them from sticking to their mold. This stuff will impeade a good bond between the stock and bedding compond. I had a couple minor problems with this when I bedded a Bulter Creek stock last year. So...wash it up well and let it dry completely.

 

And above all else, scratch up the bedding areas well!

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I would add a couple of things to all this good advice.

First look at bedding the entire receiver along its full length. Due to the way the stock is made it will give you some additional support and help keep the action located.

Second, one line of thinking is that the bottom of the recoil lug sould have some clearance between it and the stock. I found this to be a problem with one of my rifles and after rebedding it my stringing problem cleared right up.

Another, larger problem for me with the Choate stock was that the forearm was very flimsy and required a little stiffening. After getting it all straightened out I really like the stock and am considering getting another.

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on the corelite stocks i drill small holes in the webbing to hold the bedding compound better....some people even thread wire through the holes..

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If I didn't like wood so much, and didn't have spare Turk bottom metal in decent shape, I'd definitely try one of those Choate stocks. They look like just the ticket for a light Mauser (if that isn't an oxymoron or something).

 

I envy you guys that have problems getting glass to stick. I seem to get it everywhere I don't want and can't get rid of it.

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