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vincewarde

How To Fix Headspace Problem?

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I recently picked up a Columbian 98 that had been rebarreled to 30-06 using a replacement stepped military barrel. Since I had no idea who did the rebarrel, I picked up a no-go gauge and sure enough, it closes easily on it. I know that I could check it with a field gauge - but I reload and a chamber that loose would have to be really hard on brass.......

 

So, a couple of questions.......

 

1) How in the world do it fix this?

 

2) Is it worth trying to salvage this barrel, or should I just write it off and by another?

 

Thanks!

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1) How in the world do it fix this?

 

2) Is it worth trying to salvage this barrel, or should I just write it off and by another?

 

Thanks!

 

switch bolts. or set the barrel back. or, don't size your brass all the way, unscrew the die a 1/4 turn or so.

 

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a small amount of the barrel needs to be removed and reinstalled...if it has no sights it would be a simple job..getting a new barrel may have the same problem ...so just fix this one ...or don"t resize your brass ....where are you located ?

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Vince, this fix requires a lathe to do right. The barrel will need to be adjusted and the sights realigned (assuming it has the military sights). If so, it is a fairly straight forward job. Simply put, Sonic is right that some metal will need to be taken off the barrel. No bolt will correct that much headspace. You can pick up a thou or two but not enough to make things right. And, with the price of mauser bolts these days, it's almost cheaper to fix it the right way.

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Vince, this fix requires a lathe to do right. The barrel will need to be adjusted and the sights realigned (assuming it has the military sights). If so, it is a fairly straight forward job. Simply put, Sonic is right that some metal will need to be taken off the barrel. No bolt will correct that much headspace. You can pick up a thou or two but not enough to make things right. And, with the price of mauser bolts these days, it's almost cheaper to fix it the right way.

 

THANK YOU everyone for your answers. Here's some more info - if anyone knows someone reliable who could do the work at a reasonable price, please let me know! The only local guy I could find hasn't returned my email.

 

1) There are no sights, so that is no problem.

 

2) I live in the Sierra foothills east of Sacramento.

 

Thanks again everyone!

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Send it to the guy who posted above you -- z1r is Mike McCabe. He does that kind of work for a living!

 

Clemson

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am I the only one here who thinks backing the sizing die off is the free solution to a $100 problem?

 

we have yet to establish that the headspace is too large. we only know it is somewhat imperfect. it may well be perfectly serviceable. how much work is being done when resizing the fired brass? perhaps very little.

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If it swallows a no-go gage it is too large, that simple. Yes, backing off the die is one way to compensate however it is a bandaid at best and a disaster waiting to happen at worst. For one thing, it relegates you to ONLY using handloads Not an option for everyone. Secondly, the action could very well have setback. Something you will not be able to determine if you simply don't FL size your brass. Heck, I've seen rifles that wouldn't close on a no-go that had severe setback. Pulling the barrel is the only way to rule out setback.

 

The backing off the die bit is much more appropriate for a new rifle where setback isn't likely and sloppy machining from the factory is.

 

Besides, by shortening the chamber back to minimum specs you will realize a boost in velocity and increased accuracy.

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If it swallows a no-go gage it is too large, that simple. Yes, backing off the die is one way to compensate however it is a bandaid at best and a disaster waiting to happen at worst. For one thing, it relegates you to ONLY using handloads Not an option for everyone. Secondly, the action could very well have setback. Something you will not be able to determine if you simply don't FL size your brass. Heck, I've seen rifles that wouldn't close on a no-go that had severe setback. Pulling the barrel is the only way to rule out setback.

 

The backing off the die bit is much more appropriate for a new rifle where setback isn't likely and sloppy machining from the factory is.

 

Besides, by shortening the chamber back to minimum specs you will realize a boost in velocity and increased accuracy.

 

Besides, I have another 30-06, and if it shoots well in this Mauser, I would like to use the same reloads I use in my H&R single shot (They are well below maximum). It therefore makes sense to resize the case, not just the neck.

 

z1r - I'll shoot you an email about getting this fixed.

 

Thanks again everyone!

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