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Bedding Questions


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#1 walnut

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 03:43 PM

Well there's gonna be alot of wood replaced under the recvr of this Higgins 50 FN. I have a pretty good plan, but I'm confused on a few things. Some things I know: The backside of the recoil lug has to be tight against the bedding. The rear radius of the top tang should be relieved so not to split the stock. This gun has a ferrule for the rear screw. As I understand this is to set the space between the upper and lower tangs. It's too short so I'll make another. What I need to know:
Is the rear ferrule supposed to help absorb recoil? I ask because things I've read say to glass it in, but the hole is 1/16 larger than the screw. I guess my question is should everything back there be fitted or is it only supposed to be sandwiching the top and bottom? Also there is about .009" gap between the top of the box and the action, and only in the front. Should this be greater and even? My concern here is the 2 pc trigger which works fine if I put .011" shims back and front and snug it. I'm also considering drilling out the plastic fake crossbolts and replacing with ebony rods. Anyone taken any of these out?
Ron

#2 z1r

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Posted 30 January 2008 - 04:40 PM

Typically there is a gap between the bottom metal and the action. I assume you are keeping the two piece, triggerguard mounted trigger? If so, as you point out, itis imperative to maintain the proper relationship between the trigger & sear for safety reasons. The rear guide is just to maintain teh proper amount of clearance at the rear. Most people seem to glas sthem in to avoid them constantly falling out. They really should not be used as a recoil lug for fear of splitting the wrist. Sounds like you got the jist of things.

#3 Bob58

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 07:38 AM

Any ideas why a guard-mounted trigger was used? It seems it would decrease manufacturing tolerances and unfavorably impact safety if not manufactured within tolerance. My Model 50 guard-mounted trigger pull feels quite nice, but not really any better than the more standard mauser triggers.

#4 Clemson

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 07:43 AM

I just removed the one on my Model 50 when I restocked it. I replaced with a conventional Timney.

Clemson

#5 z1r

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Posted 31 January 2008 - 08:41 AM

Just be sure to assemble without the stock first using whatever pillars/spacers you intend to use to check function before putting it into the stock.

#6 walnut

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Posted 01 February 2008 - 11:30 AM

I would also think it would be harder to mfg this way. However, both ends are spring loaded towards each other, so that may make up a small amount of error. Mine is crisp and not heavy. I'll leave it for now, but will test it every step of the way like Z says.




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