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Mauser Double Trigger?


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#1 rivitir

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 08:50 PM

As you know I'm working on my Mauser project. And the other night I was watching a movie and noticed the rifle the "hero" was sporting looked like a Mauser. It has a spoon handle on the bolt and a double set/hair trigger. Very similar to the picture I attached, a very beautiful rifle.

The trigger and finger guard I can't find anywhere. Know of a place I can get one? Do you think this would be good or should I just stick with a single trigger?

I've never used a double trigger before so I wanted to ask the group what your thoughts are compared to something like a Timney?

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#2 pacrat

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 09:24 PM

Your rifle, your call.

The Timney Featherweight series is adjustable down to a few ounces. Does not require a new trigger guard.

Double Set triggers been around for over a hundred years (way cool) but require a lot of meticulous fitting and tuning and a new longer (shotgun style) trigger guard.

#3 z1r

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Posted 02 March 2010 - 09:34 PM

All the parts you need can be found at Brownells, or NECG.

#4 Vladymere

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:50 PM

As Z1 stated, the parts are available from NECG and Brownells. Those aat Brownells, I believe, are actualy from NECG. NECG imports them from Germany, made by Recnagle or AKAH.

A shotgun bow is not necessary for a double set trigger on a Mauser when using the proper components but looks much better, in my opinion. I have rifles done both ways.

The parts are not cheap and there is a bit of hand fitting.

I think a single set trigger can also be purchased. These act like a normal trigger or push the trigger forward to set the trigger.

Vlad

#5 rivitir

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 01:59 PM

...
Double Set triggers been around for over a hundred years (way cool) but require a lot of meticulous fitting and tuning and a new longer (shotgun style) trigger guard.


Are you saying single triggers are more reliable or that it just takes more time in order to install a double trigger?

#6 Bob58

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 06:09 PM

... I was watching a movie and noticed the rifle the "hero" was sporting looked like a Mauser. It has a spoon handle on the bolt and a double set/hair trigger...


Like Melvin Purvis in Public Enemies?

#7 Rojelio

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Posted 03 March 2010 - 09:10 PM

As you know I'm working on my Mauser project. And the other night I was watching a movie and noticed the rifle the "hero" was sporting looked like a Mauser. It has a spoon handle on the bolt and a double set/hair trigger. Very similar to the picture I attached, a very beautiful rifle.

The trigger and finger guard I can't find anywhere. Know of a place I can get one? Do you think this would be good or should I just stick with a single trigger?

I've never used a double trigger before so I wanted to ask the group what your thoughts are compared to something like a Timney?


rivitir, my advice would be if you are building this as a hunting rifle, then, forget the DST. If you are building a target rifle, a DST would be a neat addition, but, not necessary. Timney makes a nice trigger and way less expensive and easier to install.

#8 Vladymere

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 11:03 AM

rivitir, my advice would be if you are building this as a hunting rifle, then, forget the DST. If you are building a target rifle, a DST would be a neat addition, but, not necessary. Timney makes a nice trigger and way less expensive and easier to install.


This is good advice but double triggers add a lot of "cool" factor.

They seem to be fairly common on late 1800/early 1900 German/Austrian sporting rifles. These guys may have had a lot of time to set up their hunting shots but I don't know how.

Vlad

#9 rivitir

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 08:38 PM

Like Melvin Purvis in Public Enemies?


Yup. Thats exactly where I seen it.

Rojelio, I agree that double triggers are not "necessary" but its not about a need. It's just cool. And I already have a couple good hunting rifles so I'm wanting to turn this into a long range target rifle and change it over from 8mm K98 to 6.5x55 or 7x57. I can't decide. I would really like to try F-Class shooting and I want a light kick so this rifle is primarily going to be "just for fun" shooting.

But as was pointed out this will be expensive and difficult to install. So I'm planning on installing a Timney first, then later I'll switch it over to a double.

#10 z1r

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Posted 04 March 2010 - 10:46 PM

Yup. Thats exactly where I seen it.

Rojelio, I agree that double triggers are not "necessary" but its not about a need. It's just cool. And I already have a couple good hunting rifles so I'm wanting to turn this into a long range target rifle and change it over from 8mm K98 to 6.5x55 or 7x57. I can't decide. I would really like to try F-Class shooting and I want a light kick so this rifle is primarily going to be "just for fun" shooting.

But as was pointed out this will be expensive and difficult to install. So I'm planning on installing a Timney first, then later I'll switch it over to a double.



Not that expensive and not that difficult.

#11 Vladymere

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 02:24 PM

Not that expensive and not that difficult.


Peoples perception of expensive is relative. NECG parts (Recnagle parts) from Brownells will run $177 and shipping. That's a bit more thatn a Timney or a Bold trigger assembly. Here is a link http://www.brownells...LE_SET_TRIGGERS

For an experienced, competent smith like Mike it probably is not difficult. I believe I could install a set and plan to do so in the future. I have a couple of used sets I have picked up over the years. Having never done it before I belive I will find it a challange to properly cut the opening in the trigger guard.

If you have never fooled around with these as an existing setup on a rifle the challenge would be compounded. Not an insurmountable challenge though.

rivitir, I think you should go for it if you want to. I'm sure all here will be interested to follow your progress and It sounds like Mike might be willing to offer advise. (I hope I'm not putting words in your mouth Mike)

Vlad

#12 dirtyjim

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Posted 05 March 2010 - 08:30 PM

i have two mausers and a springfield 1903 with set triggers along with two mauser project rifles with set triggers.
if you do install a dst practice with it a lot before trying to hunt with it because once it set they are very touchy. just flicking the safety off is enough of a jar to set the rifle off.
with a dst the bolt does not need to be cocked to practice, the trigger will still function regardless of whether the bolt is even in the rifle.

#13 rivitir

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Posted 10 March 2010 - 07:47 PM

Since I'm just getting my start in rifle smithing I figured I would start with a timney so I understand better how the trigger assembly works with the bolt. That and its less then half the price of a double. :D

But ultimately I want to convert it to a double. Ever since I seen Quigley I wanted a rifle like that with a double trigger. But until I seen public enemies I never knew they built Mausers with double triggers.

As I make progress on my Mauser and Mosin I will post pictures, and I'm sure as I make progress I will have many more questions for you pros.

#14 Guest_Keith Harris_*

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 10:39 AM

I have a K98 that was reissued to the Spannish Army after the war and has been converted to 308 and militarized to their specifications, any idea on whats its worth? It is in fair condition

#15 ken98k

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Posted 25 February 2011 - 11:20 AM

I have a K98 that was reissued to the Spannish Army after the war and has been converted to 308 and militarized to their specifications, any idea on whats its worth? It is in fair condition


$100.00




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