Jump to content


Photo

Stock Help


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 donmarkey

donmarkey
  • Members
  • 1,631 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Detroit MI

Posted 11 February 2007 - 11:03 AM

The rest of the inletting is far from professional, but I'm getting better. I inlet the guard first and then had to shift it forward to avoid gaps at the top around the tang and the front ring. I know I should weld up the guard and recontour, but I'm looking for a easier fix seeing that it is kind of hidden under the bow. Any suggestions?
See the gap behind the guard.
-Don



#2 z1r

z1r
  • Members
  • 2,462 posts
  • Location:Denver, CO.
  • Interests:Guns, hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, good beer and things that make people think.

Posted 11 February 2007 - 11:10 AM

There is no easy fix that in the end won't look like an easy fix.

Neat project. I have all the parts assembled for such a project. Got the Brno M21 stock & barrel and similar bow. Mine will one day become an 8x60S.

#3 donmarkey

donmarkey
  • Members
  • 1,631 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Detroit MI

Posted 11 February 2007 - 11:34 AM

Thanks, but of course that wasn't the answer I wanted to hear. I never planned on doing a project like this, but this is put together from some parts from another member here, that they were trying to get rid of. First I was just going to assemble it, but then you get ideas in your head. 1st shotgun bow, 2nd hinging the guard, 3rd surface grinding the action, 4th new bolt handle (remember that backwards one), now I have a square bridge and matching front I'm building. It keeps going. I inlet the guard to deep and had to completely rebuild the raised panels, I thought I would never recover from that one. But I don't think it looks too bad.
-Don



#4 Doble Troble

Doble Troble
  • Members
  • 1,721 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:In a relatively good place, but it's not OR
  • Interests:Making the world a better place to live in.

Posted 11 February 2007 - 05:50 PM

That's a beautiful rifle!

If it were a perfect rifle you'd probably get a big head and become insufferable.

Be happy with that little gap- without it you'd probably have to find something else to do after mastering sporterizing.

#5 ken98k

ken98k
  • Members
  • 2,711 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Alaska
  • Interests:Hunting, Shooting, Camping, Boating, Jeeps, and MAUSER rifles

Posted 11 February 2007 - 10:59 PM

Where did you find that stock?

#6 donmarkey

donmarkey
  • Members
  • 1,631 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Detroit MI

Posted 12 February 2007 - 05:54 PM

QUOTE(kenak2 @ Feb 11 2007, 11:59 PM) View Post
Where did you find that stock?

You'd have to ask Sailormilan2, I bought it from him. I think it is an old fajen.
-Don

#7 tinkerfive

tinkerfive
  • Members
  • 767 posts

Posted 13 February 2007 - 06:58 PM

Don

I've had good experiences with epoxy products by a company know as PC7.

I used their white porcelain epoxy to repair a hole in a dish washer.
It held until the rest of the dish washer wore out.

I've been using their wood filler product to fill in gaps on my sporterized stocks.
It stains well and becomes difficult to tell.

If you were to coat your T-guard with release and mask off the rest of the stock
you may be able to fill that gap to be barely noticeable.

I suggest the masking because it can leave an oil type stain if it were to get on
the surface of the wood.

Best of luck
Tinker

#8 donmarkey

donmarkey
  • Members
  • 1,631 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Detroit MI

Posted 14 April 2007 - 04:01 PM

I finally was able to work alittle on one of my own projects. I ended up building a whole new guard using a 98 this time instead of a fn. There is still a little gap, but it's alot better. Do you think it'll look alright with a little dyed glass bed?
-Don



#9 BobVZ

BobVZ
  • Members
  • 172 posts

Posted 14 April 2007 - 05:07 PM

There are two things you can do to the stock to hide this error that I can think of at this time.

1. Use a wood filler (as others have suggested) to fill this area, then grain and stain it to blend with the rest of the wood. I like using the Elmers brand of acrylic fillers because they dry fast and can be tinted with acrylic artists colors. For your stock the dark walnut might be a good choice(available at most home improvement centers and hardware). After it is dry, use an Exacto blade to cut shallow grain lines that mimic the natural wood. You can practice on some scrap to get a feel for it. Apply some finish to the stock and patch, then when that's dry, color the repair with tinted lacquer to blend. Then apply the final coats of finish.

2. By the look of your photos there is a fair amount of wood above the metal that will need to be sanded down. I have been successful closing some gaps by using a punch to peen down(compress) the wood, causing it to expand into the gap. Just be careful not to peen it below the metal(of course you could file down the metal to compensate). Once you sand down, you won't be able to detect the repair.


Bob

#10 littlecanoe

littlecanoe
  • Members
  • 504 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Between the Mississippi and the Appalacians.

Posted 14 April 2007 - 08:04 PM

Don,
I'm still perfecting my inletting skills and end up with gaps also. Usually worst at the end of the tange. One option that I have considered is taking a thin strip of matching wood and steaming it to bend around the tange. I was thinking that you could then open up the stock to receive that thin strip of wood and glue into place.

Not sure how it would look. It would hide the error and close the gap. Wouldn't be a quick or easy fix but at least there would be wood fiber there.
LC

#11 z1r

z1r
  • Members
  • 2,462 posts
  • Location:Denver, CO.
  • Interests:Guns, hunting, fishing, hiking, camping, good beer and things that make people think.

Posted 14 April 2007 - 08:18 PM

Don,

Looks good. I think a bit of acraglass & dye is the quick fix. Otherwise, gluing some shavings in will work too.

#12 donmarkey

donmarkey
  • Members
  • 1,631 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Detroit MI

Posted 14 April 2007 - 08:56 PM

Thanks guys, I think I'll try peening it like Bob suggested and get on to finish sanding and finishing. I'll bed the guard when I bed the action. There's other imperfections in the stock, I can't be to fussy.
-Don

#13 AzRednek

AzRednek
  • Members
  • 4,827 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Phx Az

Posted 14 April 2007 - 10:27 PM

QUOTE(kenak2 @ Feb 12 2007, 04:59 AM) View Post
Where did you find that stock?


Kenak, I got two stocks that look just like that one from Midway a few years ago. If I remember correctly, Z or somebody else from the the old group posted a link to a deal that included an A&B barrel, metal butt plate and grip cap. Myself and several others jumped on it. I can't recall if it was a closeout but it might be worth your time to search Midway's website to see if the stock is still avaialble.

#14 Doble Troble

Doble Troble
  • Members
  • 1,721 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:In a relatively good place, but it's not OR
  • Interests:Making the world a better place to live in.

Posted 16 April 2007 - 09:45 PM

Wow, nice fix!

And kudos for not giving up (as I would have).

Not giving up and learning to fix these problems is the difference between Bubbas and craftsmen.

Thanks for the encouragement to work on craftsmanship!




1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users